Lilies Sing at Gettysburg. Photopoetry by Keith R Wahl

February 02, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

Lilies Sing at Gettysburg

Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge

Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 01 20230707 850_0839_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 01 20230707 850_0839_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties.

Upon hallowed ground, where steel did sing its grisly song,
Where shadows stretched from heroes fallen, brave and strong,
I stood amidst the silence, vast and strangely still,
Where echoes whispered battles fought, of lives unfilled.

But then, amidst the weathered grass, a sight did pierce my gaze,
A fragile bloom, a tiger lily, its beauty filled the maze
Of memories etched in stone, where cannons once did roar,
A testament to life reborn, on battlefields of yore.

And softly came the words, on wings of angels borne,
From battle hymn once sung, of hope amidst the morn:
"In beauty of the lilies, Christ was born across the sea,
With glory in His bosom, that transfigures you and me."

Oh, gentle flower blooming, where thunder once did shake,
You speak of peace eternal, for love's enduring sake.
Though shadows linger still, and scars upon the land,
Your fragile hope reminds us, of redemption close at hand.

So let the lilies whisper, to hearts both cold and torn,
Of life that springs from darkness, of battles yet unborn,
Where love shall be the victor, and swords shall turn to dust,
And in the fields of Gettysburg, blooms peace, serene and just.

Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 01 20230707 850_0839_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 01 20230707 850_0839_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 02 20230707 850_0840_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 02 20230707 850_0840_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 03 20230707 850_0841_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 03 20230707 850_0841_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 04 20230707 850_0842_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 04 20230707 850_0842_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 05 20230707 850_0843_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 05 20230707 850_0843_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 06 20230707 850_0844_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 06 20230707 850_0844_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 07 20230707 850_0845_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 07 20230707 850_0845_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties. Lilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 08 20230707 850_0846_displayLilies in the Field at Oak Ridge 08 20230707 850_0846_displayObservations from Oak Ridge, Gettysburg, PA. Late in the morning of July 1, the I Corps division of John Robinson arrived and extended Wadsworth’s McPherson Ridge position northward. By early afternoon, Confederates from Ewell’s Second Corps arrived on the battlefield from the north. The 5-brigade division of Robert Rodes, at 8,000 men the largest in Lee’s army, deployed straddling Oak Ridge on the right flank of the Union line. The undulating terrain and poor leadership control led to Rodes’ brigade being committed at different points along the Federal position instead of in one, concentrated blow. Heavy casualties were incurred as their attacks were poorly coordinated and the Union men held fast. The brigade of Alfred Iverson was particularly devastated, suffering 65% casualties.

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© Keith R Wahl, Made From RI/Made From RI Gallery, 2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Keith R Wahl and Made From RI/Made From RI Gallery with appropriate and specific direction to the original.



 

 


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